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What are Eye Floaters?

What are eye floaters?

Eye floaters are spots in your vision that drift away when you move your eye. These eye flashes can become more intense when you look at something bright, such as the sun or a sharp light. Eye floaters can cast a shadow over your vision, but are usually nothing more than a temporary nuisance. Mild cases of eye floaters shouldn’t affect the overall quality of your vision or eye health.  

 

Some eye flashes might appear as black spots in vision, dots, or cobwebs that seem to dart away from you when attempting to look directly at them. In very rare cases eye floaters are a cause for serious concern. Knowing the signs is important to determine when to speak with a doctor.  

What causes eye floaters?

One known cause of is age. As the protein fibers that make up the vitreous, a gel-like substance of the eye, begin to shrink down to shreds, they can cause shadows. This aging process of the eye is the most common issue causing black spots in vision and does not typically pose any serious threats to your eye health.  

Other, less common causes include:

Eye injuries:  Inflammation in the back of the eye is one example of an eye injury that can cause floaters in vision.

Bleeding in the eye: Conditions such as diabetes can cause bleeding in the vitreous and can cause you to see black spots

• Nearsightedness: People with myopia (nearsighted vision) are often more likely to experience eye floaters. 

You should speak to your doctor if you believe you’re seeing black spots due to an eye injury or bleeding in the eye.

When should you see a doctor?

Other signs that suggest you should speak with a doctor include increased number of black dots in vision, flashes of light in the same eye as the floaters, or darkened vision on any side or sides of the eye. These symptoms could be linked to more serious issues, such as a retinal tear. 

A tear in the retina is a serious condition that should be treated immediately. If untreated, it could lead to permanent vision loss. If you have experienced any of these symptoms related to your eye floaters, you should speak to your doctor immediately to ensure you get any necessary treatments to maintain good eye health.

Can a pair of glasses treat eye floaters?

Because eye floaters are often more noticeable under bright lights, wearing dark glasses can help minimize the effect they have on your eye sight. Glasses with a tint that reduce glare are the best option for those who experience eye floaters. With SmartBuyGlasses you can get a new pair of polarized sunglasses that are perfect for reducing eye flashes while outdoors. You can also reduce glare and eye floaters by investing in a pair of photochromic lenses. 

Other ways to treat eye floaters

There is no specific eye floaters cure as more often than not this condition does not require any intervention. Eye floater treatments depend on the severity of the cause. If your eye floaters are caused by a retinal tear, for instance, then cures can include a laser or freezing treatment. 

 

For  eye floaters caused by changes of the vitreous due to ageing, there typically isn’t any treatment recommended. In this case, eye floaters shouldn’t be a threat to your overall vision. If the eye floaters are bothering you, try shifting your eyes up and down to shift the fluid around. This exercise will usually eliminate eye floaters. For other recommended eye exercises, discover our guide to keepign your eyes fit and healthy here 

Ask the Optician

ASK NOW

What Are Eye Floaters?

What are eye floaters?

Eye floaters are spots in your vision that drift away when you move your eye. These eye flashes can become more intense when you look at something bright, such as the sun or a sharp light. Eye floaters can cast a shadow over your vision, but are usually nothing more than a temporary nuisance. Mild cases of eye floaters shouldn’t affect the overall quality of your vision or eye health.  

 

Some eye flashes might appear as black spots in vision, dots, or cobwebs that seem to dart away from you when attempting to look directly at them. In very rare cases eye floaters are a cause for serious concern. Knowing the signs is important to determine when to speak with a doctor.  

What causes eye floaters?

One known cause is age. As the protein fibers that make up the vitreous, a gel-like substance of the eye, begin to shrink down to shreds, they can cause shadows. This aging process of the eye is the most common issue causing black spots in vision and does not typically pose any serious threats to your eye health.  

Other, less common causes include:

• Eye injuries:  Inflammation in the back of the eye is one example of an eye injury that can cause floaters in vision.

• Bleeding in the eye: Conditions such as diabetes can cause bleeding in the vitreous and can cause you to see black spots

• Nearsightedness: People with myopia (nearsighted vision) are often more likely to experience eye floaters. 

You should speak to your doctor if you believe you’re seeing black spots due to an eye injury or bleeding in the eye.

When should you see a doctor?

Other signs that suggest you should speak with a doctor include increased number of black dots in vision, flashes of light in the same eye as the floaters, or darkened vision on any side or sides of the eye. These symptoms could be linked to more serious issues, such as a retinal tear. 

A tear in the retina is a serious condition that should be treated immediately. If untreated, it could lead to permanent vision loss. If you have experienced any of these symptoms related to your eye floaters, you should speak to your doctor immediately to ensure you get any necessary treatments to maintain good eye health.

Can a pair of glasses treat eye floaters?

Because eye floaters are often more noticeable under bright lights, wearing dark glasses can help minimize the effect they have on your eye sight. Glasses with a tint that reduce glare are the best option for those who experience eye floaters. With SmartBuyGlasses you can get a new pair of polarized sunglasses that are perfect for reducing eye flashes while outdoors. You can also reduce glare and eye floaters by investing in a pair of photochromic lenses. 

Other ways to treat eye floaters

There is no specific eye floaters cure as more often than not this condition does not require any intervention. Eye floater treatments depend on the severity of the cause. If your eye floaters are caused by a retinal tear, for instance, then cures can include a laser or freezing treatment. 

 

For  eye floaters caused by changes of the vitreous due to ageing, there typically isn’t any treatment recommended. In this case, eye floaters shouldn’t be a threat to your overall vision. If the eye floaters are bothering you, try shifting your eyes up and down to shift the fluid around. This exercise will usually eliminate eye floaters. For other recommended eye exercises, discover our guide to keepign your eyes fit and healthy here 

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